Hrm 560 Assignment 5

Unformatted text preview: Strayer University Assignment 5: Change Management Plan HRM 560 – Managing Organizational Change By Damian Gibbs Submitted to: Dr. Paul Jaikaran Winter 2016 1. Describe the company in terms of industry, size, number of employees, and history. Answer: IBM also known as International Business Machine has been around since the late 1800’s. The original name of the organization was the Computing- Tabulating- Recording Company (C-T-R). In 1914, Thomas J. Watson joined the organization and soon became president. Watson used his charisma to increase moral and established employee sports teams, family outings and a company band. An idea that is regularly touted within the walls of IBM today, “THINK,” became a mantra for the C-T-R employees. In 1924, The ComputingTabulating- Recording Co. is retitled IBM, which had already been operating in Canada under that name since 1917 (http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/history/year_1924.html). As of the end of 2015, IBM had approximately 378,000 employees worldwide; it no longer breaks out numbers for individual countries (http://www.ibmemployee.com/). IBM has an Open Door policy called Speak Up! The organization places its values on the employee by showing respect for the individual, their rights and dignity (http://www.ibm.com/ibm/responsibility/ibm_policies.html#hrprinciples). A few other programs and policies include comprehensive employee opinion surveys, daily bulletins, mentorships, educational training (THINK 40), education reimbursement, informational media, and the intranet to name a few (http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/documents/pdf/hr.pdf). With the policies and procedures, IBM’s goal is to seek feedback from its internal customer on the nature of the business, how one feels about the leaders and the direction the organization is going and how well both the leaders and the organization is doing. While these programs engage the employees and are said to be fair, because these anonymous surveys are submitted online via an internal server, most subordinates will only go so far when providing feedback as the assumption is that they could potentially be black balled or insubordinate for voicing opinions. Each year, after these surveys are complete, the water cooler chatter is that the surveys are outdated, peers are questioning who was honest in evaluating management, and the organization is preaching work life balance but the actions of the Frontline managers do not align. The open door policy is effective for the organization. In my opinion, it gives the HR manager or panel, as well as the organization, depending on circumstance, the opportunity to mitigate, make necessary changes, and cause for the organization to engage in passive retaliation. Many of the employees that have voiced grievances have quickly become subject to scrutiny. Either aligning these employees to managers whom micro-manage, revoking remote access, or creating unreachable goals that lead to action plans that dictate some type of discipline up to termination. 2. Analyze in detail the current HR practice, policy, process, or procedure that you believe should be changed. Answer: IBM Global Employment Standards are said to be set high base on how business is conducted. The organization makes a point to maintain compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Employees are required to comply with all IBM policies, procedures and practices at all times and are responsible for consulting their management if they have any questions. These practices are emphasized through annual training known as BCG’s (business conduct guidelines). Other policies that are standardized are as follows: Wages and benefits; Working hours; Nondiscrimination and harassment; Respect and dignity; Freedom of association; Health and safety; Protection of the environment; Laws, including regulations and other legal requirements; Ethical dealings; and Management Systems just to name a few; When viewing the management system I would have to point out the annual employee review is both outdated and sets the employees against one another instead of supporting camaraderie. This system is based upon annual departmental goals, once chosen are set in stone, are ranked from 1 to 4 with 1 being the echelon and four being the bottom of the barrel After a mini-poll conducted by HR, 2015, ushered in a change. The single number label will be no more. In its place, five dimensions will now be evaluated: business results, impact on client success, innovation, personal responsibility to others, and skills (http://finance.yahoo.com/news/ibm-ditching-contentious-employee-review195247489.html;_ylt=AwrBT6PjFrBWHqwApw9XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvb G8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw--). These will include shorter-term goals, and quarterly feedback. With this system the employees can gauge where they are and take necessary steps to improve their performance immediately. 3. Formulate three (3) valid reasons for the proposed change based on current change management theories. Answer: The reasons for the proposed change is the feedback from the internal customer, a declining stock price due to poor operational success, dwindling morale within the organization based upon poor work life balance, employees that feel as if they do not belong because ideas are not being heard. The open door program may be a bit more difficult to improve but management should be open to address what the issues are and setup a game plan to improve. Knowing the expectations of the department and the leaders goes a long way in correcting actions. Having procedures established allows the individual the opportunity measure their performance against what is expected and areas one is doing well or needs improvement. The reason that the open door policy needs to be changed is in fact many times employees are labeled or black balled once they voice a complaint or their concern. Within a business such as IBM I call the helpdesk and they immediately send me a request to remote access my pc. This confirms in my opinion if I submit an appeal and concern, which is anonymous, the information can be tracked. Appeals and Concerns is a way to voice grievance about a process, situation, or manager. If these were anonymous the investigation would end there but in many cases many employees eventually are blocked from promotions and in some instances given poor performance ratings in effort to phase the employee out. Many times it may be difficult to transition into new roles because training for these potential roles are mandated but only cover the surface. The workload is heavy that training takes a backseat and becomes an afterthought or additional daily task to complete. Think 40 should be based upon aligning your skill with your current role or a role one would like to see themselves in. Most of the time the training hours selected are not reviewed by management not in line with the current job role, and do not necessarily require assessment of learning. In cases of such this does not allow the employee to further their career but acts as a number to tout amongst board members. In my personal experience I have watched internal applicants who meet the qualification and have performed jobs in the past get overlooked only to bring an outsider in who was friends with a hiring manager and lacked experience to be successful in the role. An example would be the role that I work in currently. When I applied for the position I did not have the experience required for new applicants. While I had worked in the industry for a while and was familiar with a multitude of processes the job description requirements were limited. Over the course of a six month period this has changed. New applicant requirement is three years’ experience. While an outside employee in the same field would be able to fulfill this role one of the keys systems utilized to work in the position would require a minimum of three weeks training to be able to navigate in the role successfully. In this case, an employee that had been in the role as a contractor for three months and had received many kudo’s was overlooked in the decision to bring someone in as a full time employee. Educational reimbursement program needs an overhaul as well. As an employee with a rating of average one can receive reimbursement for external education training hours. In many cases it is not a requirement to have the skills align with your current job role. The biggest hiccup the approval process. Executive management has to approve all request for the reimbursement. While this typically should not present an issue many of the executives within your chain of command work from home. The challenge with this is the delay in replying to a simple email with approval of decline seemingly is impossible to get. Personally, I have been a full-time employee for two and a half years and I am yet to successfully complete an application to receive reimbursement for external training hours. It is my opinion that organizations would desire to increase the level of the competent employees and nurture individuals that desire to grow with the organization and gain greater returns on investment. Instead there are a number of shortfalls within the application process and the shortfalls allow deadlines to dictate the approval or denial of the program. 4. Appraise the diagnostic tools that you can use to determine an organization’s readiness for change. Answer: There are multiple frameworks to use to assess readiness for change such as COPS, Seven-S and Burke-Litwin. COPS. Looks at four separate aspects of the organization and the comparative strengths and weaknesses of each are evaluated: Culture, Operations, People, and Systems (Hodges 439). Seven-S emphasizes the interaction of different parts of an organization. The foundation of this model is based on the interdependence amongst seven variables: strategy, structure, systems, staff, style, skills and shared values (Hodges 446). Burke–Litwin model. In this model the complexity and interdependence of the interior and exterior influences affecting change. It demonstrates in what way the external environment affects the performance of the organization and how organizational performance affects the external environment. It is predictive rather than prescriptive in that it specifies the nature of causal relationships and predicts the likely effect of changing certain elements rather than others. It also differentiates between two types of change: transformational change and transactional/incremental change (Hodges 437). Propose two (2) diagnostic tools which you can utilize to determine if the organization is ready for change. Defend why you believe the diagnostic tools selected are the best choice for diagnosing change in the organization. Answer: Seven-S and Burke-Litwin would be the tools I would use to determine if the organization is ready for change. Burke-Litwin simple because it is predictive. Knowing what the outcome can allow one to make adjustments and fine tune strategy. It is difficult to know where you are going if you cannot verify where you are. Seven-S because though everyone is an individual strategy it needs to align with the organizations mission; structure of the team needs to be common place as it is the official and unofficial distribution of task and duties; systems or the process (should be outlined); staff has to be onboard and working the details; style is conduct and philosophy of the people; skills are the abilities of the people; and shared values is the belief system of the people. 5. Using one (1) of the diagnostic tools you selected, assess the organization’s readiness for change. Answer: Based upon Seven-S variables I believe IBM is ready for change. The System is not operating at its most efficient and it is being pointed out by the Staff therefore, the Structure is also failing. The Strategy of old is not working. IBM (Style) has held a history of what some term Rape, Pillage, and Burn, where they acquire business, use up good things, and sell the company off or dissolve it. Trends in the market says we need more than buying power to sustain. The Shared values of the organization, Thinker’s, is that we have to change in order to maintain success in the market. Moving from hardware to software was the start but there is more to come a. Provide results of the diagnostic analysis. The results indicate the transition period is here. IBM has been hardware or production heavy and has started to move towards service oriented and software niche. They were a catalyst for change as most production in the U.S. has moved to foreign soil because it is cheaper to import that to produce. b. Explain the results. The aligning of the performance ratings in these areas make more sense. Services are a dime a dozen and if you continue to focus of quantity served vices the quality of the service the market will become an illusion. This goes for both the internal and external customer. 6. Interpret whether or not the organization is ready for change. Substantiate your conclusion by referencing current change management theories. Answer: The way the organization is shaping up in the market I believe IBM is ready for change. IBM knows it has to be fluid and adaptable and has turned to HR to get more feedback from the staff as to their needs. They have to unfreeze in order to move and make things happen and once new behaviors are adapted within the culture they can refreeze. Without this transition IBM would have to continue to attempt to use its capital and old ideology of rape, pillage and burn theatrics. Section II: Kotter Change Plan: Utilizing the Kotter eight (8) step method of change, create a solid change management plan for the HR initiative you identified as requiring improvement. 1. Ascertain how each of the steps applies to your specific organization. Answer: The steps are: 1) create a sense of urgency; 2) build a guiding team; 3) get the vision right; 4) communicate the vision for buy-in; 5) empower action; 6) create short-term wins; 7) don’t let up; and 8) make change stick (Calegari, 2015). In creating a sense of urgency we would be informing the organization from the top down the importance of the project. This means as an organization we have to ensure we are taking care of both the internal as well as the external customer. Taking care of the internal customer will have everlasting rewards in that the internal customer will not only feel as if they belong but also show concern and express the way the organization treats the individual. If you require certain software to run your business and you have purchased that software one expects a certain level of service to come along with that purchase. Providing the customer with the ends and outs of the product to ensure the software purchased fits the need of customer is essential to maintaining the customer. If the internal customer who represents the organization is out solely for profits and is not providing the correct level of customer service then it is imperative to refocus the culture in order to show all involved we are committed to maintaining fruitful relationships. Building a guiding team allows one to facilitate management and oversight of the project and provide status of set milestones. The guiding team should have both a liaison and a subject matter expert within each department with which weekly meetings between them, management and the liaison report findings an areas of improvement. This allows feedback from multiple sources on areas to focus and issues encountered in support of software or services. The guiding team is then able to take a micro and a macro approach to the area most in need of change. Getting the vision right is a big step as one has to establish exactly where you are, where you want to be and map the necessary steps to reach that goal. This requires taking a look at the end and working backwards. All of those part of the organization have a role in supporting the vision and should consider themselves agents of change. Nothing is perfect so each individual shares the workload in process improvement. Once the vision is laid out the intricate details are carried out by those in support of the vision. If we cannot find solutions to your business needs or provide services that fit the need of the consumer then the sustainability of the organization diminishes. Communication of the vision for buy-in is equally important. Communicating the vision for buy-in as a necessary condition across all elements of the change process (Bleser, 2014). This is necessary because without the support of the workers it may be difficult to carry out the vision in the most effective manner. Ants work as one unit to sustain its colony. It is easy to see that each worker ant is aware of the vision and that vision has been communicated effectively. Those who do not buy-in need to be weeded out to ensure the desired culture exist. Empowering action is a very necessary step. Many change efforts fail due to insufficient attention to this step and the result is the stalling of a change effort at the beginning stages of its implementation (https://managementisajourney.com/leading-change-step-5-empower-broadbased-action/). It is said that omitting this step is equivalent to starting a cross country trip in the old family car without any assessment, repair, or maintenance of the vehicle (https://managementisajourney.com/leading-change-step-5-empower-broad-based-action/). As a support specialist the individual has to hold some power to ensure the happiness of the clientele. This could be something as simple as allowing the consumer to return a product that is out of warranty based on the relationship or number of years the consumer has done business with the organization. Creating short-term wins allows the organization to take a look at the progress of the changes implemented based upon the desired direction. This could also work two fold as a morale booster. The challenge is being able to point out the milestones set and celebrating those whom have played intricate parts of making the lasting partnership of the imposed changes. Not letting up requires consistency. A lot of times there will be resistors when change is in effect but just like turning a ship, pressure must be applied to the till or in this case the task has to be reinforced until the change has been adopted. Making change stick, according to an article by John P. Kotter and Dan S. Cohen, http://watercoolernewsletter.com/culture-is-the-key-to-makingchange-stick/, changing the culture is something that takes place last not first. Once the new way of operating has been shown to be successful the culture can truly change. 2a. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: establishing a sense of urgency. Answer: In order to establish a sense of urgency I would point out one of the many complaints highlighted in the written correspondence received from the customer. It is easy to point out faults but taking a look at the actual issue and establishing not only a need to change but a solution would be key. For example having someone to review the complaints and reach out to the appropriate parties and submit necessary task to provide a faster turnaround time would be the initial goal. 2b. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: creating coalition. Answer: The guiding coalition would have a subject matter expert, a member of management, and an additional rotating member of the departments to meet with the coalition and report weekly to upper level management their input and how effective everyone feels the changes are. We are looking for honest and input. Those who carry out the changes need to feel part of the team and because they carry out the task on a daily their input is valuable and they should be able to provide real-time feedback on areas of improvement. 2c. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: developing vision and strategy. Answer: Within this step the guiding coalition will provide understanding of the opportunities or concerns at hand and offer clear vision and strategy for proceeding. This allows action in the right direction, quick and effective communication, can be good for immediate and empowered action. 2d. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: communicating the vision. Answer: As with any vision the core values must be defined. In addition to defining the core values each department should determine what part they play in reaching the goals. In essences the department should evaluate what they do and explain how it is effective in its contribution. 2e. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: empowering broad-based action. Answer: Empowering broad based action will take training. As one of the critical steps a precedent needs to be set. Once management is trained on the action they can sign-off on the training and begin implementing the action. Also allowing the individual to operate their line of business as if it is their own empowers the internal customer to make executive decisions instead of seeking approval for each minute task one may encounter. Within the actions to be communicated a set time frame to get the teams up to speed and each individual should sign-off they have complete the training and understand the process from beginning to end. There will be resistance but having a sign-off and check-in allows each level of management to check-in on the progress of the implemented action. Communicating the expectations should also be part of the design. Generally, a 60 day notice to inform of the upcoming change and 90 day window to allot for the transition. Those who comply willingly reap greater rewards and recognition. Those slow to adapt will be subject to disciplinary action. 2f. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: generating short- term wins. Answer: Short-term wins are key to success in any long-term solution. With short-term wins one is allowed to measure their success of how they are doing towards reaching the goal. Without out the short-term wins or as I like to refer to them milestones there is no resting period. Like with each milestone I believe there is an uphill journey and a resting area. The resting area allows us to look back over the climb and evaluate what things went smoothly and what areas of the climb were rough. From that standpoint we can make small changes to smooth out some of the previous rough areas. This also allows the organization to give praise for the win and maintain morale of the incumbents. An example would be as simple as establishing an automated system to schedule call backs to the consumers at specified time periods instead of having long hold periods. This way the consumer can decide if they would like to continue to hold, given the consumer has the time, or be contacted at a later time when the organization is fielding fewer calls. If this is more successful than the automated interactive voice response system then the organization will be able to track the request of the consumers to speak with a live representative vices an automated service. 2g. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: consolidating gains and producing more change. Answer: In consolidating gains according to an article published by Julien Pollack and Rachel Pollack in March of 2014 many of the ideas here lack research on how to actually apply change management techniques, or critically questions their effectiveness. In theory the idea is to take away the short gains or milestones and add greater focus to continue producing more change until the end result is reached. This would look like addressing the concerns of the consumer and providing a solution to the problem the external customer has highlighted and replicating that solution in each area where change is needed. It is definitely easier said than done but the requirements are based upon accountability of all those who carry out the task. If every solution is dealt with through task submitted behind the scenes then all knowledgeable of the issues would have at a minimum verify a task is in process. Systems should also be established to hold those who were knowledgeable and failed to take the minimum steps necessary accountable for negligence. We should all feel it is our task to help the consumer or otherwise we all fail. I would relate this to a truck with a towing package and a V8 engine. When running on all cylinders the towing of a vehicle or any item the vehicles engine operates with ease; however if one of the cylinders experienced misfires then the cylinders do not operate in unison and the engine experiences more stress. While the truck can still operate with the loss of one of its cylinders it is not the same powerful force it once was and if allowed to go for prolonged periods the affect does more harm to the other departments or cylinders. Eventually, if not corrected the engine would either throw a rod and cease to work altogether. Likewise at this stage we have to capitalize or the positive gains and take the change implemented to produce more change. 2h. Develop a strategy that illustrates how you would address each of the eight (8) stages of change: anchoring new approaches into the culture. Answer: Rewarding positive gains or behaviors and disciplinary actions for unfavorable actions would be my answer to anchoring new approaches into the culture. While there are multiple steps to anchoring new approaches into the culture of the organization proposing an identitybased model of action that combines elements from multiple perspectives including tool kit theory, work on cultural capital, and identity theory would be the most effective to me (Miles, 2013). While each theory is considered to be incomplete in anchoring new approaches into the culture the combination provides a more open solution to the issue Section III: Resistance and Communication: Research methods of minimizing resistance to change and create plan to address resistance within your change management initiative. 1. Diagnose the reasons for resistance to change. Answer: There are a multitude of reasons for resistance to change. Some of the reasons are fear of the unknown, lack of competence, misunderstanding of the need for change, emotional attachment to routine, poor communication and not being consulted. The fear arises many times simply because of the unknown. In these cases the party involved is uninformed of the change and how the change may affect their daily lives and may only proceed out of greater fear of standing still. With this in mind there may also be a lack of competence in catching on transitioning or even believing the change is necessary. Employees who have carried out a process for many years will generally feel as if the change is not necessary and may have issues with the change of the routine altogether. Emotional attachments may have something to do with how one feels about these changes and adds insult to injury when dealing with employees that have held their positions or have tenure with the organization. Not being consulted and or forthcoming in the change will definitely bring about resistance. Even if the ideas presented are not implemented it can make a difference in the level of resistance if the incumbents feel as if they have some input. 2. Interpret the potential causes of resistance in the organization. Identify and describe three (3) potential causes of resistance to your change plan. Identify and describe three (3) potential sources of resistance to your change plan. Answer: Resistance to change can stem from poor communication within a business but it begins with upper level management. How the details are communicated to subordinates and how questions and complaints are fielded are necessary issues to address prior to changes going into effect. Many times second handed information only adds to the resistance and that information is skewed and inaccurate when communication is not effective within the hierarchy. Feeling excluded by the organization instead of open solicitation to ensure that everyone has an opportunity to voice ideas or opinions will create barriers of resistance as well. Often times when employees hear of a sudden change, to which they have had no input, the party may be offended. This goes against Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and potential weakens morale. Self-interest of the employees instead of the organizations can also lead to resistance of change. One may look to advance their own agenda or preserve the status quo in these situations. The poor communication creates anxiety of the incumbent and may also lead to distrust. This lack of judgment in communicating the change may also create resentment as their feedback was not sought when making decisions. Insecurity may be another source of resistance to the change plan as one becomes comfortable in an environment and changes to that environment are implemented it creates a level of uncertainty. 3. Create a plan for minimizing possible resistance to your change management plan. Answer: The plan is communication. Having methods to deal with the resistance by identifying the situations to apply the approach, list advantages, and drawbacks of the approach. This gives the most effective plan for minimizing possible resistance. In addition to communicating, soliciting input of the employees will draw on the need, according to Maslow’s hierarchy, to feel like one belongs. 4. Elaborate on the relationship between resistance to change and communication. Answer: According to Elving (2015) “A well-planned communication program is vital in the implementation of change (Kotter 1996; Elving 2005; Fernandez and Rainey 2006). Elving (2005) argues that one of the main purposes of change communication should be to inform employees about change. This informative function of communication will effect employee readiness and acceptance for change.” Without communication employees will often feel blindsided. It is not easy to accept change in these instances as the lack of communication warrants distrust. If the organization is reluctant to share its vision then the assumption is the organization is going in a different route altogether and it does not include the current staff. There is no reason to leave those carrying out the daily task unless the organization intends to move forward without the employees. “The degree to which employees are able to offer informed input into the change strategy is largely contingent on whether organizations share information through a variety of communication media, and enable workforce participation at the planning and implementation stages”. 5. Evaluate three (3) communication strategies. Answer: Education and communication would be used where there is a lack of information or inaccurate information. Once those involved are informed they will often assist with the implementation of the change (Paren, 2015). Participation and involvement where the participants do not have all the data they need to design the change, and where others have considerable power to resist. Those who participate will be committed to implementing change, and any relevant material obtained within the session will be integrated in the change plan (Paren, 2015). Negotiation and agreement where someone of group will clearly lose our in a change and where that group has considerable power to resist. Sometimes it is fairly easy way to reduce major resistance (Paren, 2015). 6. Recommend one (1) communication strategy that would be applicable to your organization. Diagnose why this communication strategy is best for your organization. Answer: I would apply the Underscore and explore approach to communication. Like the telland-sell approach, this strategy involves managers focusing on a few core messages. But unlike the tell-and-sell approach, leaders and managers give others the creative freedom they need to explore the implications of the issues. Those who adopt this approach are concerned not only with developing a few core messages but also with listening attentively for potential misunderstandings and unrecognized obstacles (Hodges 281). In general the employees know the day to day operations and have a good sense of areas of improvement. Soliciting feedback even if its use is not immediately employed can have significant and intrinsic value for both the employee and the employer. 7. Create a solid communication plan for your change initiative. Answer: The communications plan has to be relevant to the audience. Method of communication will be ongoing weekly occurrence and will vary between face-to-face, newsletters, and internal media. The types of messages communicated will determine which interaction and feedback is always welcome. Any messages about change having impact on the workforce would always be face-to-face. Reference: Bleser, W. K., Miller-Day, M., Naughton, D., Bricker, P. L., Cronholm, P. F., & Gabbay, R. A. (2014). Strategies for Achieving Whole-Practice Engagement and Buy-in to the PatientCentered Medical Home. Annals of Family Medicine, 12(1), 37-45 9p. doi:10.1370/afm.1564 Calegari, M. F., Sibley, R. E., & Turner, M. E. (2015). A ROADMAP FOR USING KOTTER'S ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE MODEL TO BUILD FACULTY ENGAGEMENT IN ACCREDITATION. Academy of Educational Leadership Journal, 19(3), 31-43. Hodges, Julie. Sustaining Change in Organizations. Sage Publications Ltd (UK), 12/2014. VitalBook file. Pages 437, 439 & 446. Kelly, P., McClelland, R.J., Nawaz, M. K. (2015) THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTEXT WHEN REFORMING PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS: PAKISTAN PUTS A ‘TOE’ IN THE WATER https://www.researchgate.net/publication/284176716_THE_IMPORTANCE_OF_CONT EXT_WHEN_REFORMING_PUBLIC_ORGANIZATIONS_PAKISTAN_PUTS_A_'TO E'_IN_THE_WATER McKay, K., Kuntz, J. C., & Näswall, K. (2013). The Effect of Affective Commitment, Communication and Participation on Resistance to Change: The Role of Change Readiness. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 42(2), 29-40. Miles, A. (2013). Addressing the Problem of Cultural Anchoring: An Identity-Based Model of Culture in Action. Social Psychology Quarterly, 76(2), 210-227 18p. Doi: 10.1177/0190272514524062 Moss, D., & Warnaby, G. (1998). Communications strategy? Strategy communication? Integrating different perspectives. Journal of Marketing Communications, 4(3), 131-140. Doi: 10.1080/135272698345807 Paren, J. (2015). Resistance to Change in Organizations. Proceedings of the Multidisciplinary Academic Conference, 1-9. Pollack, J., & Pollack, R. (2015). Using Kotter's Eight Stage Process to Manage an Organizational Change Program: Presentation and Practice. Systemic Practice & Action Research, 28(1), 51-66. Doi: 10.1007/s11213-014-9317-0 ...
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Unformatted text preview: Strayer University Assignment 1: Selecting a Company HRM 560 – Managing Organizational Change by Damian Gibbs Submitted to: Dr. Paul Jaikaran Winter 2016 1. Assess the current Human Resource programs, policies, procedures, or initiatives in terms of effectiveness. Answer: IBM also known as International Business Machine has been around since the late 1800’s. The original name of the organization was the Computing- Tabulating- Recording Company (C-T-R). In 1914, Thomas J. Watson joined the organization and soon became president. Watson used his charisma to increase moral and established employee sports teams, family outings and a company band. An idea that is regularly touted within the walls of IBM today, “THINK,” became a mantra for the C-T-R employees. In 1924, The Computing- Tabulating- Recording Co. is retitled IBM, which had already been operating in Canada under that name since 1917 (http://www03.ibm.com/ibm/history/history/year_1924.html). IBM has an Open Door policy called Speak Up! The organization places its values on the employee by showing respect for the individual, their rights and dignity (http://www.ibm.com/ibm/responsibility/ibm_policies.html#hrprinciples). A few other programs and policies include comprehensive employee opinion surveys, daily bulletins, mentorships, educational training (THINK 40), education reimbursement, informational media, and the intranet to name a few (http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/documents/pdf/hr.pdf). With the policies and procedures, IBM’s goal is to seek feedback from its internal customer on the nature of the business, how one feels about the leaders and the direction the organization is going and how well both the leaders and the organization is doing. 2. Hypothesize the changes that require improvement. Answer: While these programs engage the employees and are said to be fair, because these anonymous surveys are submitted online via an internal server, most subordinates will only go so far when providing feedback as the assumption is that they could potentially be black balled or insubordinate for voicing opinions. Each year, after these surveys are complete, the water cooler chatter is that the surveys are outdated, peers are questioning who was honest in evaluating management, and the organization is preaching work life balance but the actions of the Frontline managers do not align. The open door policy is effective for the organization. In my opinion, it gives the HR manager or panel, as well as the organization, depending on circumstance, the opportunity to mitigate, make necessary changes, and cause for the organization to engage in passive retaliation. Many of the employees that have voiced grievances have quickly become subject to scrutiny. Either aligning these employees to managers whom micro-manage, revoking remote access, or creating unreachable goals that lead to action plans that dictate some type of discipline up to termination. The THINK 40 policy is a requirement within the organization to get 40 hours of training based upon your individual development goals for your perspective department or developmental goals of where one aspires to be within the organization. It is as effective as the leadership. When management aspires to know the team members work life goals then they can align them with the perspective training. In cases where management at a minimum establishes an action plan to grow the employee in their perspective role then the training can still be effective. Many times the training is not effective either because the employee is just fulfilling a position, the training is not related to the role, or the employees skills are not assessed to accurately determine the level of training or program to assign. The open door program may be a bit more difficult to improve but management should be open to address what the issues are and setup a game plan to improve. Knowing the expectations of the department and the leaders goes a long way in correcting actions. Having procedures established allows the individual the opportunity measure their performance against what is expected and areas one is doing well or needs improvement. Each of these programs mentioned can be improved but like anything there needs to be checks and balances. These checks and balances should be based upon a team of 5 individuals comprised of equal votes. The individuals should be representative of every level of the organization. Taking into consideration there may be a possible 40/60 split in voting, a compromise should be reached that is agreed upon by those voting and the parties involved. For example if a sales rep would like to receive training in HR and cannot get the mentor to move forward one should be appointed. While this is a requirement, the mentors do not have to actually make themselves available to you. This I have personal experience with. After reaching out to the individual to potentially meet on a break, at their convenience, or request use of THINK 40 time for the individual, in which both parties receives training hours I am yet to me with 1 of the three identified mentors assigned. A simple change would be to have required quarterly updates with the mentors/mentees in the program to check progress and make it part of the rating for bonuses. ...
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