Gasping Garbage Compare And Contrast Essays

Product Description

I created some materials to go with our reading series text "The Case of the Gasping Garbage" from the Reading Street 4th grade textbook by Scott Foresman.

I normally give students a spelling/vocabulary sheet on the Friday before the week we start the story to get students familiar with the words. They have the opportunity to take a spelling test on Monday and move up to the Amazing list for the Friday test.

I made a comprehension worksheet that goes with the story where students can fill in answers as they read or if they are re-reading the story. This helps students go back to the text to pull information out of the story.

I made vocabulary cards for a matching game to use with students that are colored or just black and white. You could also give each student a card in the class and they could find their match with another student and stand by each other. One sheet I made with the matching cards small so that they can take them home and practice.


Included:
Spelling list

Vocabulary list

Amazing word list

Word Analysis sheet - The sheet has word endings -ian, -ist, -ism and practice space where students need to create their own words.

Vocabulary test - this is a short, fill in the blank test

Comprehension Reading questions - this sheet has page numbers and questions based on skills that are focused on for the week.

Compare/Contrast question page

Plot Diagram graphic organizer page

Individual vocabulary matching cards
Class vocabulary matching cards


Creative Clips - frames and clip art
Lovin Lit - frames and clip art
Hello Literacy - Jen Jones - all FONTS!! :)

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The Grade 3 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Texts include a balance of genres and are appropriately rigorous and complex for Grade 3 students. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundationalskills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level. The instructional materials support the building of knowledge through repeated practice with appropriate grade-level complex text organized around a topic. Vocabulary is addressed in each module, though academic vocabulary is not built across multiple texts. Culminating tasks require students to read, discuss, analyze, and write about texts while students participate in a volume of reading to build knowledge. Modules are developed to support and build knowledge, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening to demonstrate grade-level literacy proficiency at the end of the school year.

The Grade 3 instructional materials meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Most tasks and questions are grounded in evidence. The instructional materials include texts that are worthy of students' time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.Materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundationalskills and making meaning during reading. Materials also provide opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.Overall, appropriately complex grade-level texts are are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language to build foundational skills and strengthen literacy skills.

Criterion 1a-1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.

The instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity. Central texts are of publishable quality and address topics of interests to Grade 3 students. The instructional materials include a mixture of both literary and informational texts, most of which are at an appropriate level of complexity and rigor for Grade 3 students. The instructional materials include a text complexity analysis with rubrics and rationales for their purposes and placement.The materials support students increasing literacy skills over the year and provide students with many opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading throughout each unit and module through anchor texts, supporting texts, and leveled libraries.

4/4

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and consider a range of interests.

Anchor texts and text sets encompass multiple themes and integrate content areas such as Social Studies and Science. Texts are examined multiple times for multiple purposes and are used to expand big ideas, build academic vocabulary, and facilitate access to future similar texts. Most texts are engaging, build knowledge, and facilitate access to future text while building towards independent grade-level reading.

Unit 1 Topic: Science Integration: Observing the World Around Us

  • Unit 1, Module A: The Cast of the Gasping Garbage by Michele Torrey: This text integrates and builds knowledge of science content such as the scientific method, builds academic vocabulary, and is engaging through a story structure that has multiple problems to be solved.
  • Unit 1, Module B: Treasure in the Trees by Christopher Cheng: This text is published by Scott Foreman. The text is realistic fiction supported with illustrations. The text has an accessible concept, mainly compound and complex sentences, third person point of view, and idioms and figurative language. The text continues building knowledge of the scientific process and includes the preservation of habitats.

Unit 2 Topic: Social Studies Integration: Connecting Character, Culture, and Community

  • Unit 2, Module A: The Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill is a text with a straightforward plot, a series of chronological episodes with backstory inserted, native Alaskan terms, and a blend of simple, compound, and complex sentences. This historical fiction has won awards and builds knowledge about this time in history.
  • Unit 2, Module B: Deep Down and Other Extreme Places to Live by Shirin Bridge is an informational text that includes challenging concepts that are supported with photographs, captions, and maps. These supports help readers make sense of what they have read. The text also includes challenging academic and domain-specific vocabulary that builds students’ knowledge of places that may be unfamiliar to students.

Unit 3 Topic: Science Integration: Seeking Explanations

  • Unit 3, Module A: Storm in the Night by award winning author Mary Stolz is examined multiple time for multiple purposes. The text includes a story within a story. Students must focus on sensory details throughout as well as build understanding of advanced vocabulary in order to grasp the central message of the text.
  • Unit 3, Module B: Weather by Seymour Simon has images that support the students' understanding of the science related content knowledge. Students build academic vocabulary and content knowledge to access multiple texts within the module’s text set.

Unit 4 Topic: Social Studies Integration: Becoming an Active Citizen

  • Unit 4, Module A: Brave Girl by Michelle Markel introduces challenging concepts to build knowledge and explore additional texts that share similar topics and ideas.
  • Unit 4, Module B: What is a Government? by Logan Everett and Simon Adams helps readers understand that texts contain main ideas and details that support them. The informational texts build knowledge about government both past and present and includes academic vocabulary that will facilitate access to future texts found within the modules text set.

Supplementary texts included in each module’s text set also encompass the Unit themes and help to integrate content areas while expanding big ideas and academic vocabulary.

4/4

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Some of the text types included in the curriculum are narrative, quote excerpts, tall tales, and essays, as well as a variety of informational texts.

Note: The majority of the anchor texts in the first half of the year are literary (Units 1-2), and the majority of informational anchor texts are included in the second half of the year (Units 3-4). When reviewing the supplemental texts, there is a balance of literary and informational texts within each unit as well.

Examples representing the balance of text types and genres include the following:

  • Anchor Text - The Year of Miss Agnes (Literary, Historical Fiction)
  • Supporting Text -The Athabascans (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - The Frog Princess (Literary, Legend)
  • Anchor Text - The Cast of the Gasping Garbage (Literary/Informational, Mystery and Suspense)
  • Supporting Text - Location, Location, Location (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - Thunder Cake (Literary, Realistic Fiction)
  • Anchor Text - Brave Girl (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - Back of the Bus (Literary, Historical Fiction)
  • Supporting Text - Below Deck: A Titanic Story (Literary, Historical Fiction)
  • Anchor Text - Deep Down and Other Extreme Places to Live (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - City Homes (Informational)
  • Supporting Text - The Song of Sky and Sand (Literary, Tale)

Standard RL3.5 asks that students refer to parts of stories, dramas and poems when writing or speaking about a text. Poetry is included in the supporting texts listed in the Implementation Guide, but not in the anchor texts. A drama is included in Unit 4.

4/4

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the indicator for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for this grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task(s).

Most texts are aligned to the complexity requirements outlined in the Common Core Standards with text complexity rubrics appearing at the back of each ReadyGEN Teacher’s Guide.

  • Unit 1 Module A The Case of the Gasping Garbage by Michele Torrey 460L (Literary): This text has an accessible concept with a series of problems that are solved. The vocabulary is general.
  • Unit 1 Module B Treasure in the Trees by Christopher Cheng 710L (Literary): This text has an accessible concept. It is realistic fiction supported with illustrations. There are mainly compound and complex sentences. It contains third person point-of-view, idioms, and figurative language.
  • Unit 2 Module A The Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill 790L (Literary): This text has a straightforward plot with a series of chronological episodes and a backstory inserted into it. It does contain native Alaskan terms and a blend of simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • Unit 2 Module B Deep Down and Other Extreme Places to Live by Shirin Bridges 740L (Informational): This is a challenging concept with academic and domain-specific vocabulary. The text is supported with photographs, captions, and maps. It consists of mainly compound sentences with some complex sentences.
  • Unit 3 Module A Storm in the Night by Mary Stolz 550L (Literary): This text contains accessible concepts and story within a story. It is sensory detailed throughout with advanced vocabulary.
  • Unit 4 Module A Brave Girl by Michelle Markel 760L (Informational): This text contains a challenging concept with a chronological story line and picture support. There are colloquial expressions and topic–related terminology.

Of the texts that are not within the grade-level band, a qualitative feature analysis gives additional insight as to the appropriateness of their placement in the curriculum. The following texts have a Lexile level above the grade level band, yet the qualitative and reader and task components make the text accessible for third grade readers.

  • Unit 4 Module B What Is a Government? by Logan Everett (Informational, 950L): Even though this Lexile level is above the grade level stretch band, chapters are supported with diagrams, charts, a glossary, and an index making this text accessible for Grade 3 students.
  • Unit 3 Module B Weather by Seymour Simon (Informational, 1020L): Even though this Lexile level is above the grade level stretch band, if teachers pre-teach the vocabulary or provide a glossary, the text would be accessible for Grade 3 students. If the teacher do not pre-teach the words, the text will be a challenge.

Every text in the close reading materials (Sleuth) is within the Lexile band outlined in the standards.

The Leveled Text Library includes readers for each unit. The books in the library begin at the Lexile band at 340L (Camping with Aunt Julie by Darlene Ramos) and go slightly above the Lexile band to 870L (Danger! Children at Work by Sharon Franklin).

2/4

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the indicator for supporting students' ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. While the texts, both anchor and supporting, fall within the grade-level band, they do not appear to provide students access to increasingly rigorous texts over the course of the school year.As seen in the quantitative and qualitative analyses of the included texts, there is not clear, defined scaffolding of the texts to ensure that students are supported to access and comprehend grade-level texts at the end of the year.While the rigor of text is appropriate in aggregate over the course of the school year, students will engage with texts at varying levels Unit to Unit and quarter to quarter in a structure that may not provide support for accelerating their literacy growth.

Over the course of the school year, students will engage in appropriately rigorous texts in aggregate, but Unit to Unit and quarter to quarter, there is broad variance in how they engage with these texts. Some examples that demonstrate this include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, students read the literary text Treasure in the Trees. This text is quantitatively measured as 710 Lexile. In Unit 2, Module A, students engage with the literary text The Year of Miss Agnes (790 Lexile) and in Module B, the informational text Deep Down and Other Extreme Places to Live (740 Lexile). The consistency of these quantitative measures, coupled with the consistency of the qualitative features of these texts, will not necessarily support students' accelerating their reading abilities.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students read the literary text A Storm in the Night, which has a quantitative measure of 550. This less-rigorous text is followed by the informational text Weather in Module B, which has a quantitative measure of 1020 Lexile.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students read the informational text A Brave Girl which has a quantitative measure of 760 Lexile.

The qualitative measures of these texts are appropriate, as are the associated tasks and questions. However, teachers may need extra support and study to help Grade 3 students navigate these variations Unit to Unit.

The supporting texts also do not consistently increase in complexity across the year. The supporting texts in Unit 3 are more complex than the supporting texts in Unit 4. The close reading (Sleuth) also does not consistently increase in complexity across the year; the text with the highest level is found in Unit 1.

2/2

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of connected texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

The anchor texts and supporting texts have a "Text Complexity Rubric" page in the Teacher Resources section that covers quantitative, qualitative, and reader and task measures.

Quantitative metrics are provided for each anchor text in four categories: Lexile Level, Average Sentence Length, Word Frequency and Page or Word Count. Qualitative measures are provided for each anchor text and supporting text in four categories: levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and theme and knowledge demands. Metrics provided for qualitative measures are in list form. Reader and Task Suggestions are in narrative form and provide teachers with suggestions for preparing all students to read the text as well as leveled tasks. For example, the following contains the Text Complexity Rubric for the supporting text The Moon Seems to Change (Unit 1, Module B):

  • Quantitative Measures- Lexile: 530L; Average Sentence Length: 9.78; Word Frequency: 3.81; Word Count: 668
  • Qualitative Measures- Levels of Meaning: accessible concept (phases of the moon; informational text; identify main idea and details); Structure: introduction, then chronological details, followed by a summary; extensive use of illustrations, labels, and diagrams of the moon phases; Language Conventionality and Clarity: mostly general vocabulary, with some domain-specific terms defined in context; simple sentences throughout; compare and contrast structure; Theme and Knowledge Demands: lunar orbit presented through closely connected text and artwork
  • Reader and Task Suggestions: Preparing to Read the Text: Review with students Earth’s orbit around the sun and the moon’s orbit around Earth; Leveled Tasks: Examine the illustrations on each page to help understand the text

At the beginning of each Module, teachers are provided with a Lexile and genre reminder about the upcoming text set. Lexiles and genres are listed for the anchor text and supporting texts. Lexiles are provided for the Sleuth texts and the Leveled Text Library. Within each unit and module, the texts are focused on a theme, which provides some rationale as to why the text was chosen.

2/2

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.

The instructional materials for Grade 3 meet the expectations of indicator 1f. The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading, and there are supports to build students’ comprehension of grade level texts in oral and silent reading.

Resources are provided to offer students texts to engage in a range and volume of reading. The eText Library includes leveled readers. The database is searchable by Lexile, Guided Reading, DRA, and Reading Maturity Matrix for initial search. Then, as a secondary search, texts can be chosen by grade level, language, comprehension skill, text feature, genre, and content area. Each unit has trade books which are authentic literacy and informational texts. These trade books are available in digital format. In addition to texts, there are independent reading activities that students can access online.

Structures are built within the day to provide students with opportunities to practice silent and oral reading. Each day students engage in independent reading with a specific focus including building stamina and becoming independent readers. In addition, small group instruction each day either focuses on vocabulary, fluency, critical thinking or comprehension (Implementation Guide). Comprehension and vocabulary instruction dominates the small group instruction, but the few fluency lessons focus on a specific aspect of fluency such as phrasing, expression, and pacing. Students hear and see the teacher model reading the text and then practice using the same text.

A scaffolded strategies handbook is also provided, which gives teachers additional ways to teach the concepts to struggling learners and English language learners. In addition, throughout the teacher’s guide there are "if/then" sections which provide the teachers with concrete things to do when students do not understand the concept.

Criterion 1g-1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

The Grade 3 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent and build towards a culminating tasks to integrates skills. The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for evidence-based discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and support student listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching. The materials include frequent opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Materials meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials reviewed provide many tasks and opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing using evidence from texts to build strong literacy skills.

2/2

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations of most questions, tasks, and assignments being text-dependent and requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Some explicit question examples include:

  • "What facts about Earth are described in the text?" (Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 10)
  • "What did ordinary Athenians and the American colonists have in common? (Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 7)

Some implicit question examples include:

  • "Why doesn’t Nell’s mother give her the answer to the truck problem?” (Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 9)
  • "Consider what the main character goes through to solve her problem. How are those accomplishments a truer reflection of the solution to her problem than what appears to be the solution?” (Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 15)

Many lessons have a Reading Analysis section where students are working toward a specific standard and engaging in either independent work or small group work to complete a task involving the text. The majority of lessons have a turn and talk after the students read, which requires the students to discuss something from the text. Some of the questions are about the text itself while some are questions that focus on author’s craft, but the majority of them require students to be engaging with the text.

  • For example, in Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 15 students identify the central message and complete the Web B Chart based on the text, Below Deck: A Titanic Story.

Each lesson has small group options which include several options for students to answer text-dependent questions.

  • For example, some options are extensions of the Close Reading or Reading Analysis sections. Students will read pieces of text, find evidence in order to answer specific questions, ask questions related to what they have read, and prove their case with evidence from the text. Depending on students’ readiness, questions are modified to meet students’ needs still addressing the standards.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 1, for students who can easily identify the main ideas and supporting details in The Athabascans, students can use the following discussion questions: "How do you know that the head of this section states the main idea? What are some details that are shown in the pictures and not described in the text?"

All lessons have a Close Reading section that includes 3 - 4 text-dependent questions.

  • For example, "How does the main title on page 12 relate to the topic of an extreme place? What does the fact box called 'The Danakil Depression' tell you? Why do you think the author put these facts in a separate box?" (Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 6)
  • For example, "What details on page 24 explain why the idea that 'every voter has the chance, and the responsibility, to vote' is so important in a democracy?" (Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 4)

Additional materials that support students engaging with the text include:

  • In the Sleuth materials (Close Reading Texts), there is a gather evidence section for each close read which requires students to find evidence from the text.
  • The Reader's and Writer's Notebook provides evidence-based questions.
  • The Baseline Assessment also includes evidence-based questions.

There is the Reader/Writer Journal which asks students to answer text-dependent questions in writing for each lesson.

2/2

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations of containing sets of high-quality sequences of text dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Every module offers a culminating task where students write to a prompt. The lessons and questions leading up to the task offer support to complete the task.

Many of the performance assessments at the end of each module and unit require the students to use evidence from the text they have read. For example, students are asked to use the text from the lessons is in Unit 2, Module B, when students are comparing and comparing two communities that they have read about. Similarly, in Unit 3, Module A, students are stating their opinion about which of two texts has a more powerful central message. Unit 3, Module B requires students to create an engaging news report about weather using texts from the unit and module. Unit 4, Module A has students choose one of the people or characters from the texts that they have read and decide which one had the greatest effect on the events in the selection.

The following culminating tasks are included in the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1
    • Module A: Students will write a story in which one or more characters use observation to solve the librarian’s problem.
    • Module B: Students will write a magazine article about something in the natural world in which they are interested.
  • Unit 2
    • Module A: Students will use what they have learned about narrative writing to write what might occur after the end of The Year of Miss Agnes.
    • Module B: Students will use what they have learned from the selections to compare and contrast two communities.
  • Unit 3
    • Module A: Student will state and support their opinion about which text, Storm in the Night or Knots on a Counting Rope, has a more powerful central message.
    • Module B: Students will use information from Weather and Living Through a Natural Disasters to create an engaging news report that explains how weather affects people.
  • Unit 4
    • Module A: Students will choose one of the people or characters they read about. They will state and support an opinion about which person or character they think had the greatest effect on the events in the selection.
    • Module B: Students will research the various ways that governments help people. They will combine what they learned to support their opinion on which aspect of government they think is most important.

2/2

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Opportunities are present for students to have evidence based discussions. For example:

  • Close reading structures are included with discussion questions so that students respond to questions with evidence from the text (Implementation Guide p. 41).
  • Structures are provided for students to work in pairs or small groups to complete a graphic organizer and discuss their responses using evidence from the text (Unit 4 Module A Lesson 17).
  • Students read texts and write to share their opinion as to which article reflects the impact of earthquakes, present their writing with the class as a speech, and are given the opportunity to respond to questions and receive constructive comments from their peers (Unit 3 Module B and Module B Performance Based Assessment)
  • In each lesson there is a close reading section where students engage in evidence based discussions using the text. There is a Whole Class Discussion routine provided in the teacher's guide that gives additional suggestions such as having students add on to each other's ideas, having students find the evidence before speaking, and prompting students to direct the conversation back to the text.

Teacher Resources offers teachers a number of routines to provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions. For example:

  • Think-Pair-Share Routine - Included in this routine are suggestions for accountable talk such as "I agree with you" when discussing the text.
  • Whole Class Discussion Routine - For example, " We are going to talk about this book together. Let’s focus on ____. If you have something to add to our conversation, raise your hand. Listen carefully to what your classmates say so you add new ideas."
  • Small Group Discussion protocol that assigns roles to each student in the group. The routine emphasizes that students should go back to the text to find evidence.
  • Read Aloud Routine - For example, "As I read aloud to you, listen carefully for moments when the main character reacts to challenges. I’ll stop on occasion for us to talk about what I’ve read."
  • Text Club Routine - For example, " Text Clubs are your opportunity to work with classmates to read and discuss different texts. The Clubs will focus on a particular aspect of reading, and every group member will have a different role to play. After you read the text independently, you will meet with your Text Club to have meaningful discussions about it."

Vocabulary routines are provided in Benchmark Vocabulary Routines for Informational and Literary Texts which are found in Teacher Resources. Following the Text Set information, teachers are also provided with more information about vocabulary in a section called Vocabulary to Unlock Text. This provides the teacher with Benchmark Vocabulary and Tier II and Tier III Words for the anchor text and supporting texts. During the speaking and listening routines, students engage with this practice with academic vocabulary.

2/2

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for supporting students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

In the majority of the lessons, there are discussion protocols for turn and talks, whole group discussions, and small group discussions. There are opportunities in all of these routines for students to speak and listen about what they read. This correlates to the Common Core Standard S.L.3.1 of engaging effectively in a range of collaborative discussions. Collaborative routines are included in the daily lessons along with protocol explanations and discussion structures. This is found in the Teacher Resource section of the Teacher’s Guide.

Writing lessons provide opportunities for students to share their writing.

  • For example, students read texts and write to inform in the format of a news report, present their “news report” to the class, and are given the opportunity to respond to questions and receive constructive comments from their peers (Unit 3, Module B, Performance Based Assessment)

In Sleuth (Close Reading materials), structures are included for students to gather evidence, ask questions regarding the text, use evidence to make a case, and prove their case to other students within their team, with all team members having a voice.

At the end of each writing lesson, there are opportunities for students to share.

  • For example, in Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 3, students are asked to share their paragraphs, and the audience members are then supposed to have a discussion about the details used in the paragraph. Guiding questions are provided.


The Performance Based Assessments at the end of each module, provide an opportunity for students to share their writing.

  • For example, in Unit 2, Module A, students share their narrative writing. The audience members are encouraged to ask questions and provide feedback. This correlates to the Common Core Standard S.L.3.1 of asking questions to check understanding of information.

2/2

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The instructional materials for Grade 3 meet the expectations of this indicator. Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Explicit instruction guides students through the writing process, requiring them to analyze good writing models from the text sets they read. There are 4 units and two modules (A & B) within each unit. The 18 lessons within each module focus on one type of writing.

Each Module’s writing lessons are based on text(s) and offer a model for students as they write. On-demand writing occurs each day when students write to what they have read in various formats. Examples of writing include taking notes, short answer, or paragraph construction. Lessons have been structures, so that by the end of the Module, students have addressed all components of the writing process.

Each module is structured the same way regarding process and on-demand writing. Representative examples of process writing include, but are not limited to, the following:

In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 13 (Narrative Writing Component): Using the text as a model, students are taught how Thunder Cake includes the necessary elements for a narrative. Students are instructed to read specific pieces at the beginning and end of the text to see what the author did to provide a sense of closure. Students are then given an opportunity to choose a problem to write about and a solution to that problem that creates closure. During independent writing practice, students are to write a brief narrative that provides a sense of closure.

In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 1 (Informative Writing): Students write informative/explanatory paragraphs that express views and provide factual information. Students are reminded to have a main idea and details to support it. Students will use the text, City Homes, as a model for how to write an informative/explanatory text. Students are to write their paragraphs in their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal and are encouraged to add a digital component where they are to find pictures with details to support their main idea. Scaffolds are provided as well as specific examples from the text to support students. Many of the tasks listed are preparing students for process writing.

On-demand writing occurs across the year long materials. Examples of on-demand writing appear in each Unit and typically provide practice with component skills as they build to a larger project. The examples in Unit 2 are indicative of the types of on-demand writing activities that take place in each Unit:

  • Writing descriptions of graphics
  • Introducing and developing a topic
  • Group related information and write a response
  • Using linking words to connect ideas
  • Providing a concluding section or statement
  • Taking brief notes on sources

2/2

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the criteria for providing opportunities for students to address different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution by the standards. Each lesson includes a writing lesson, and over the course of the school year, students engage with multiple genres and modes of writing.

The following Units provide students varied writing opportunities:

  • Unit 1, Module A- Narrative: Students write a story in which one or more characters use observation to solve the librarian's problem.
  • Unit 1, Module B- Informative/Explanatory: Students write a magazine article about something in the natural world which interests them.
  • Unit 2, Module A- Narrative: Students use what they learned to write what might occur after the end of The Year of Miss Agnes.
  • Unit 2, Module B- Informative/ Explanatory: Students will compare and contrast communities using what they learned from the selections.
  • Unit 3, Module A- Opinion: Students will write about which text has a more powerful central message.
  • Unit 3, Module B- Informational/Explanatory: Students will write a news report that explains how weather affects people.
  • Unit 4, Module A- Opinion: Students will write about one of the people or characters they read about supporting their opinion about the person or character they choose.
  • Unit 4, Module B- Opinion: Students will write about the aspect of government they think is most important.

Writing Rubrics are provided for all types of writing (aligned to the standards) in the Teacher's Edition.

2/2

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for the materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

Students are taught each day to carefully analyze and synthesize sources, write to sources, and defend claims as part of Whole Group Writing instruction. Each writing lesson focuses on a writing mode that is specified in the Common Core Standards.

The Reading and Writing Journal (RWJ) frequently provides “Write in Response to Reading” prompts. Students are required to gather and use evidence from the text to support their responses.

Some examples of opportunities for evidence-based writing in the instructional materials include:

  • In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 10, students are asked, “Why the amount of water humans drink limited, even though 70% of Earth’s surface is covered? Use evidence from the text to support your answer."
  • In Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 15, teachers explain to students that a story has a central message and that this message is what the author wants the reader to learn from the story. The whole class begins filling out the organizer, and then the materials allow for small groups or pairs of students to complete the organizer using the evidence from the text. Students can write the central message in their Reading and Writing Journal.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 10, students describe, with evidence from the text, how the characters' in Knots on a Counting Rope and Storm in the Night actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • In some of the informative/explanatory writing lessons, students need to use the text to help them with research. For example, in Unit 3, Module B, Lesson 8, students are told to use pages from the text to help them write facts and quotations on their topic of what life is liking living in the shadow of a volcano.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, Lesson 10, students learn that when readers compare and contrast two texts, they look for similarities and difference between people, events, and important ideas of the two texts. As students read, they are to place a sticky note next to actions and events that reveal the important ideas of the text. Students will be asked to explain how analyzing the events in the text helped them to understand the important ideas of the text.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 10, using a graphic organizer, teachers model how to use the chapter titles to find the focus of the first two chapters, how to find the main idea in a paragraph of body copy, and how to use the caption and labels to understand the diagram of Earth's solar system.

Performance-Based Assessments (PBA) are assigned at the end of each module. These include writing projects where students use the anchor text and the major writing skill from the module in order to respond to questions to synthesize learning. These projects lead students to analyze and synthesize the texts they have read.

  • For example, in the Unit 4 Module A Performance-Based Assessment, students state and support an opinion about which person or character they think had the greatest effect on the events in the selection.

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Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Students begin the year identifying parts of a sentence and work their way to compound complex sentences.

Grammar lessons align to the Grade 3 Common Core State Standards for Language (L.3.1 and L.3.2) that include but are not limited to capitalization, punctuation, adverbs, subject-verb agreement, and simple verb compound sentences.

  • In Unit 1, Module A, students identify and use nouns, nouns as subjects, and regular plural nouns. Students also identify and use verbs, regular past tense verbs, simple verb tenses, simple sentences using regular verbs, temporal words, quotation marks, and commas in dialogue.
  • In Unit 1 Module B, students identify and use nouns as subjects, subject verb agreement, past tense, present tense, future tense, and adjectives.
  • In Unit 2, Module A, students identify and use adverbs, capital letters at the beginning of sentences, and capital letters in appropriate words in titles and capital proper nouns. Students also identify and use adverbs in sentences and superlative adverbs, and students write compound sentences.
  • In Unit 2, Module B, students identify and use conjunctions in sentences and plural verbs.
  • In Unit 3, Module A, students make possessives.
  • In Unit 3, Module B, students identify superlative adverbs.
  • In Unit 4, Module A, students identify and use nouns, plural nouns, and irregular plural nouns. Students also work with suffixes and base words, prefixes and base words, abstract nouns, pronouns, antecedent agreement, possessives, commas, and quotation marks.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, students study subject verb agreement, simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and adverbs.

Conventions are included in the writing rubrics found within each Unit to assess application of conventions listed in the language standards.

Grammar lessons require students to practice the skill in and out of context:

  • For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 9, teachers are expected to write three sentences with verbs that require -s, and then students are expected to change the subject and verb form so that the verb does not add an -s.
  • For example, in Unit 2, Module A, Lesson 8, students learn how to use commas in dialogue. After the teacher models how to do it, students are asked to write a short dialogue using commas in the appropriate places.

For each grammar lesson, there is additional practice in the Reader's and Writer's Journal. This practice may or may not be in context. The Reading/Writing Journal includes lessons specific to the conventions of writing and provides students with on-demand writing tasks.

Criterion 1o-1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the criteria for supporting students in developing their foundational skills in literacy. Texts, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, syntax, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Materials provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading while providing students ample opportunity to increase oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level.

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Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet expectations that materials, questions and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills that build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression.

Phonics and decoding/encoding instruction is explicit and in the foundational skills section. There are lessons on syllable patterns and vowel types, as well as high frequency words. There are also lessons on compound words, base words, and prefixes and suffixes (beginning Unit 2, Module B and continuing throughout each unit). The units address the foundational skills found in the Common Core Standards for Grade 3.

The series of Foundational Skill lessons include opportunities to practice skills in and out of context. Students can apply the skills when reading in the Practice Reader.

Foundational Skills mini-lessons (in the Teacher's Edition) within each lesson include:

  • An introduction to isolated foundational/phonic skills,
  • Practice with the skill, and
  • Application of the skill with specific words/sentences/phrases
    • For example, students discuss the meaning of –ment, -hood, and -ish and then find words with those suffixes in Brave Girl; next they create a definition for each word and read in Practice Readers to develop automaticity in decoding words with those suffixes (Unit 4 Module A Lessons 6-10).

Foundational skills are to be implemented within the 30-40 minute whole group instruction which includes the Close Read and Reading Analysis. Students may receive additional instruction or practice during small group which is allocated for 30-40 minutes.

Examples of lessons include:

  • Students are introduced to -ly, -ful, -ness, -less, -able, and -ible in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 11. Students identify the base word and recall the meaning of the suffix as practice. Students complete lessons 11-15 for review and practice.
  • In Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 11, students continue to review and practice prefixes im- and in- in Lessons 12-15. There are limited opportunities for students to actually understand the meaning of the most common prefixes.
  • According to the Implementation Guide, picture word cards, alphabet cards, decoding readers, phonics activity mats, and sound spelling cards are included to support the phonics lessons.

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Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. There are limited opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in the context of their reading.

Materials include Word Analysis mini lessons as a part of each lesson which includes decoding words in context using the Practice Readers. Students are given opportunities to apply foundational skills learned in the lessons by reading decodable readers. However, the decodable readers are not connected to the anchor text. Examples include:

  • Unit 1 Module A: Short vowels and syllables VC/CV, plurals, base words and endings, vowel digraphs Context practice: Students find words that have the syllable pattern VC/CV in the story Location, Location, Location
  • Students are introduced to suffixes -ly, -ful, -ness, -less, -able, -ible in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 11. Students identify the base word and recall the meaning of the suffix as practice. Students have lessons 11- 15 for review and practice.
  • Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 13 prefixes pre-, mid-, over-, bi-, out-, de- are all introduced. Students have lessons 13-15 to review and practice.
  • Students are introduced to Prefixes im-, and in- in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 11. They continue to review and practice in Lessons 12-15.

Materials include Language Analysis mini lessons as a part of some lessons. Language Analysis mini lessons are sometimes about word analysis, and Language Analysis lessons are not in every lesson.

The following mini lesson topics are about practicing word analysis: Word Relationships, Academic and Domain-Specific Words, and Determine Word Meaning. For example, in Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 5 of the small group options, the teacher’s edition instructs the teacher to model how to determine the meaning of a domain-specific word and then invite the students to determine the meaning of another academic or domain-specific word. In Unit 1, Module B, Lesson 15 of small group options, the teacher’s edition instructs the teacher to ask the students, “What is the first thing that you think of when you hear plates?” Then the teacher is to help the students explore the multiple-meaning word plates. The teacher is instructed to invite students to determine the meaning of another word such as erupt on p. 28.

During Close Reading instruction, the teacher’s edition contains Scaffolded Instruction to help students use context clues. For example in Unit 3, Module A, Lesson 8, the instructional materials suggest reviewing with students ways to figure out the meaning of an unknown word such as using sentence-level and paragraph-level context clues. In the Teacher Materials for helping students with Benchmark Vocabulary in Close Reading, the teacher is reminded to use the Benchmark Vocabulary Routine for Literary or Informational Text. This protocol lists steps to help students pronounce unknown words, read the paragraph in which the word is found, discuss the meaning of the word in context, and discuss synonyms. A Tips and Tools section suggests helping students recognize context clues and make word webs (Unit 1, TR30).

Students are given opportunities to apply word analysis learned in the foundational skills lessons by participating in Phonics lessons or reading decodable practice readers. For example in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 11 of Foundational Skills, students learn the prefixes of im- and in-. Students apply their new word analysis learning to identifying prefixes in sentences and then explaining the meaning of each word with a prefix. However, the decodable readers are not connected to the anchor text.

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Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the criteria for providing students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

There are a variety of resources that include fluency instruction, fluency assessments, and scoring guides. Some include:

  • The Beginning‐of‐Year Fluency Test and Running Record assesses students’ oral reading rate and oral reading accuracy, which can be used by the teacher for instructional decisions. This tool provides the teacher with opportunities to help identify a student’s particular strengths and weaknesses in reading and language.
  • Word Analysis mini lessons are a part of each lesson, and they include decoding words in context using the Practice readers.

Fluency practice is included as a section within the small group options portion of the materials. There are "if/then" statements that provide the teacher guidance on how to support students who are not acquiring the lesson of the day. The instruction focuses on a specific part of fluency such as rate, phrasing, and accuracy. For example,

  • In Unit 2, Module B, Lesson 1, students focus on accuracy when recording themselves reading aloud the text from the day and then continue practice using a leveled text.
  • In Unit 1, Module A, Lesson 6, fluency tasks include modeling fluent reading aloud and student practice reading aloud.

There are opportunities to practice fluency with poetry as well as prose.

  • For example, in Unit 4, Module B, Lesson 1, students begin the lesson with the poem "America." The teacher's guide suggests that the teacher creates an audio recording of the poem so that students can hear it being read fluently.

In the Printable ReadyUp Intervention, there are additional fluency practices and assessments.

GATEWAY TWO

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

MEETS EXPECTATIONS

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