Encs Concordia Assignment Definition

Overview of ENCS Computing Facilities

Academic Information Technology Services (AITS) oversees a multi-platform, multi-user environment. Our structure is comprised of multiple Operating Systems, hundreds of applications, thousands of machines (servers and clients) and numerous peripherals.

Disambiguation: All ENCS Users also have a CONCORDIA NETNAME. For services regarding your NETNAME, please refer to the following webpage: http://www.concordia.ca/it/services/netname-account-management.html.

ENCS Account

Obtaining an ENCS computer account

Your ENCS computer account is your net ID within ENCS. It is required when you login to the managed systems in our Computer Labs, read your ENCS emails, ask for IT support, only to name a few examples. You are encouraged to use your ENCS account to communicate within the ENCS community. To obtain this account, you must be associated to the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science as a student, staff, faculty member or authorized personnel. If you meet any of these requirements, you should present yourself in either of the following locations: Room H0964-00 on 9th floor of the Hall Building or EV007.182, on 7th floor of the EV Building, along with your valid Concordia ID card. We will present you with 2 copies of an agreement, one of which you will need to sign (You will agree to comply with the rules and policies of the ENCS Faculty), in order to obtain your username and account password.

IMPORTANT: You should change your initial password. Understand that you are responsible for the security of your ENCS computer account. Account sharing is strictly prohibited. You can visit our Service Desk if you forget your password. Please bring along your valid Concordia ID card to obtain this service. Due to security reasons, password information will not be provided by phone or email.

Privileges of your account

Your account grants you access to certain computer labs in the Hall and EV Buildings. Your access level is dependent on your Concordia status (i.e., the program in which you are enrolled, the course in which you've registered, the research activities in which you are involved). The easiest way to determine which Computer Labs you have access to, is to get the list of lab door codes.

You may refer to the Quick Reference Guide and/or Faculty and Staff Quick Reference Guide for a general overview of ENCS account basics and our services.

Access ENCS Systems

ENCS Labs and Desktops

There are approximately 70 computer labs in Hall building for the teaching support, and 32 labs in EV building for the research support. Refer to the ENCS computer labs index for more information.

All the PC systems in the labs are dual boot(Windows and Linux) systems. You have the choice between Windows or Linux via a menu when the computer boots up. Based on the access privilege to the resource in a PC, we make three types of the image(usually referred to as cut). They are lab cut(analyst-managed, including research cut and grad cut), office cut(analyst-managed), and user-managed cut. Please refer to ENCS desktop for more information.

Software available in Windows

Software available in Windows on the Laboratory Desktop.

Remote accessing ENCS system

The analyst-managed machines can only be logged in locally in the lab. We disable the means of remote access, such as remote desktop, VNC, etc, for analyst-managed machines. However, you can access ENCS Linux hosts from any machine where there is an Internet connection.

ENCS Networking

We apply considerably restricted rules to secure ENCS network. One rule worth to know is that each network jack can only be connected to the machine that is being hooked on. Plugging another machine to a jack without informing the ENCS analysts will make none of the machines ever connected to that jack losing network connection.

To hook your own computer to ENCS network, please send us the network connection request.

Concordia Wireless Networking

Concordia University does provide a wireless network to all its members accessible mostly from any place on its campuses as long as you have a wireless interface on your PC and have a My Concordia Portal user account.

The wireless network is under the authority of the Instructional and Information Technology Services (IITS).

ENCS AITS does not have authority to act upon that network, nor does have any tool to know the status in whole or in part of the wireless network.

For all ENCS users, if you previously used the wireless network but at this time cannot establish a connection, we recommend you to do the following verifications first before asking for help.

Verify if your Portal user account is still active (please use a wired connection to do such). Your account should be active in order to establish a wireless connection.

If your account is active and you are still unable to establish a wireless connection, then consult the IITS helpline:

  • Phone: 514-848-2424 ext 7613
  • Email: help@concordia.ca

,or visit them in person in H925(SGW) or CC206 (Loyola)

ENCS Course Support

AITS supports ENCS supported courses with computer labs and required softwares. In addition, the instructor of ENCS supported course can request

  • A course account which can be used to build the course web page
  • Electronic Assignment Submission(EAS)

The course account (also referred to as group account) and Electronic Assignment Submission(EAS) are not available by default. The EAS course registration is done on this page(For course instructor only).

The information about VLSI, real-time, 490 Projects, etc, can be found on Additional Resources.


Just passing courses required to fulfill curriculum requirements is not sufficient to qualify a student to graduate. There is also an academic performance requirement (grade point average) in most degree and certificate programs. See the pertinent section of each Faculty’s entry in the Calendar for complete details:

          Faculty of Arts and Science — Section 31
          John Molson School of Business — Section 61
          Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science — Section 71
          Faculty of Fine Arts — Section 81


16.1.12     Official Transcript of Credits

An official transcript of credits (hereafter “official transcript”) is a version of the student record intended for the use of external institutions, organizations, and employers. It is a complete academic record and includes all undergraduate and/or graduate courses followed at Concordia. It is accompanied by an explanation of its terminology and is sent directly to the addressee at the written request of the student, provided there is no outstanding balance owing to the University. An official transcript is printed on security paper, and is signed and sealed by the University Registrar.
Details on how to request an official transcript may be found at concordia.ca/students/records/transcripts/request-official-transcripts.


16.2     Curriculum Regulations

16.2.1     Modifications to Academic Programs and Regulations

With the exception of the following conditions, the curriculum requirements in effect at the time students are admitted or readmitted to a program (e.g. BA, BFA, Certificate in Business Studies) and/or concentration (e.g. major, specialization), are the requirements that apply to them until they complete their program.

  1. The University reserves the right to modify academic program requirements in the light of (a) changing trends in academic and professional fields, and (b) the availability of resources. In the exceptional event that a program is substantially altered by the University Senate, the University recognizes its responsibility to offer suitable transition arrangements for students. The new program requirements should become effective for all students no later than five years after the effective date of change for newly admitted students.
  2. When a program is discontinued, the University recognizes its responsibility to offer courses in the program while phasing it out according to a schedule appropriate to the needs of the affected students. Students will be informed of the schedule when the decision is made to phase the program out.
    When students in a discontinued program have not been registered for three years, it may not be possible to enable them to complete that program. They may, however, transfer into another program in the University for which they meet the admission requirements.
  3. Where students acquire credit towards a degree or certificate in a discontinuous manner and over a protracted time, the University reserves the right, at any time, to require them to take further credits or fulfill additional requirements to obtain that degree or certificate.
  4. Modifications to the academic regulations in §16.1 and 16.3 become effective for all students on a given date regardless of the student’s date of admission to a program, with the following exceptions:
                 16.1.9     High Academic Achievement
                 16.2.2     Residence Requirements
                 16.3.10  Academic Performance
    Modifications to these three regulations apply only to students admitted or readmitted to a program on or after the effective date of such modifications.
  5. In the event a student is readmitted after failing an academic year, the University reserves the right to require the student to take additional credits or to repeat certain courses. The student is also subject to changes in academic regulations or program requirements in effect at the time of the student’s readmission.
  6. Notwithstanding the above, all students in Engineering programs are required to meet the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) standards. Students are required to graduate having met the substantial equivalent of the curriculum in force in the winter term prior to degree conferral. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that their course selection meets the program requirements for their graduation. For further information, see §71.10.7.

16.2.2     Residence Requirements

Residence requirements define the number of credits that students working towards a Concordia University degree must take at the University itself.

  1. Of the total number of credits required for an undergraduate degree, students must take a minimum of 45 credits, normally the last 45, at Concordia University. The BEng, BA (Early Childhood and Elementary Education), BEd (Teaching English as a Second Language), BSc in Athletic Therapy, and BFA (Specialization in Art Education) require 60 credits, normally the last 60, at Concordia.
  2. At least 50 per cent of the credits for honours, specializations, majors, minors or other concentrations must be taken at Concordia. The BComm and BAdmin programs also require that at least 50 per cent of the core courses be taken at Concordia.
  3. Concordia University students who wish to include courses taken at another university within their residence requirements must obtain permission in advance from their Faculty Student Request Committee. Those wishing to engage in interuniversity exchanges in Quebec or student exchange programs must obtain authorization to cross-register from his or her academic advisor, the appropriate Associate Dean or delegate of the student’s Faculty, and the University Registrar. For participation in the Concordia Student Exchange Program, the student must comply with the specific Faculty requirements outlined at concordia.ca/students/exchanges/csep.
  4. Students who already have an undergraduate degree may undertake a second undergraduate degree, subject to the conditions below. Before registering, such students should consider whether their purpose might be better served by enrolling in a graduate degree, diploma, or certificate program. To obtain a second undergraduate degree, students must:
    1. Apply and register in a program with a higher concentration than a minor, and
    2. Complete at least two-thirds of the credits normally required for the second degree in courses other than those credited to the first degree — for example, a minimum of 60 credits must be completed when the normal requirement is 90 credits, and
    3. Complete at least 36 credits in the new field of concentration.
  5. An exception to 4b) above, is the BEd in TESL, for which students must complete at least half of the 120 credits required for the second degree in courses other than those credited to the first degree.
  6. Any student who is accepted at Concordia University after failing or compiling an unsatisfactory record at another university, will generally be required to complete at least 60 credits at Concordia.

16.2.3     Degree Regulations

The regulations relating to degree requirements are located in the Faculty sections:
          Faculty of Arts and Science — Section 31
          John Molson School of Business — Section 61
          Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science — Section 71
          Faculty of Fine Arts — Section 81


16.2.4     Concentration Requirements

Every undergraduate program requires a cohesive sequence of courses. To graduate in a degree program, a student must have completed one of the following concentrations: honours, specialization, major. In the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, concentrations are referred to as programs. Most of these programs have options, where students take a number of related courses in a chosen area. Honours is a highly concentrated program with a required performance level; the specialization and the major require varying degrees of concentration, normally without a performance requirement. An honours, specialization, or major can be combined with a minor. In some circumstances, a double major is also possible.

1.       Honours Programs
The University offers programs leading to an honours degree in certain disciplines. The honours program consists of 60 or more credits in a discipline, with superior performance required to enter and remain in the program. In their first year, students may register in honours program courses, but their acceptance as honours students will depend on their performance. Students who do not meet requirements for honours standing may proceed in either a specialization or a major program.
There are minimum academic standards for honours programs. The honours student must:

  1. meet general degree requirements and the specific requirements for an honours program.
  2. maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 in all honours courses; the minimum acceptable grade in any honours course is “C.”
  3. have a minimum GPA of 2.70 for honours courses taken each year. For part-time students this is calculated in 18-credit blocks.
  4. have a GPA of no less than 2.00 in non-honours courses.

Honours students who do not meet these standards will be withdrawn from the honours program and will proceed in the major or specialization program. Reinstatement in the honours program is possible only with the permission of the Faculty Honours Committee.
The programs and particular Faculty regulations are listed in the Faculty sections under “Honours Programs.”


2.       Specialization Programs
A specialization is a sequence of courses totalling 60 or more credits. In a few cases it includes a performance requirement. In addition to courses in a particular discipline, the specialization may include courses in other closely related fields.


3.       Major Programs
A major is a sequence of courses totalling 36 or more credits, except in the John Molson School of Business where the major consists of at least 24 credits in a particular discipline in addition to the required 42-credit core. The major may include certain courses in other closely related fields.


4.       Minor Programs
A minor is a sequence of courses totalling 24 or more credits, except in the John Molson School of Business where the minor consists of at least 12 credits in the chosen discipline in addition to the required 42-credit core.


5.       Combined Programs
An honours, specialization, or major program may be combined with a minor program. In some circumstances, a major program may also be combined with another major program.


6.       Certificate Programs
An undergraduate certificate is a coherent program, usually of 30 credits, made up of regular undergraduate courses. Courses taken as part of a certificate program are normally applicable to the appropriate undergraduate degree. There is no guarantee that a certificate program can be completed in one academic year.


16.2.5     Writing Skills Requirement

Students admitted into the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science must meet a writing skills requirement. (See §71.20.7.)


16.2.6     Repetition of Courses

  1. A student may repeat a failed course only once. Nevertheless, a student who fails a required course twice may appeal to the appropriate Student Request Committee for permission to take the course a third time. If permission is not granted, the student may not be allowed to continue in the University towards that program and/or degree.
  2. A student who has received a passing grade for a course may repeat the course for personal reasons (e.g. to meet an external requirement) only once. A student may appeal to the appropriate Student Request Committee for permission to take the course a third time. The student record and official transcript will include all grades, but grades with the “REPT” notation will carry no credit value.
  3. A student who wants or needs to repeat a course that is prerequisite to other courses must do so before taking any following course in the sequence.
  4. The grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used for calculating the cumulative grade point average (CGPA: see §16.3.10 II.b) and the final graduation grade point average (FGGPA: see §16.3.10 II.c).
  5. In the case of courses taken more than once in the same assessment period, only the grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used in the calculation of the assessment grade point average (AGPA: see §16.3.10 II.a).
  6. A grade obtained as the result of a penalty for academic misconduct will remain in the calculation of the AGPA, the CGPA, and the FGGPA whether or not the course has been repeated.

16.3     EVALUATION, ADMINISTRATIVE NOTATIONS, EXAMINATIONS, AND
            PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS


16.3.1     Evaluation

A university degree or certificate attests that its holder has attained a measurable level of achievement as established by a recognized system of evaluation. Thus the performance of each student in each course must be evaluated by the instructor or instructors responsible for the course.
Final grades are determined by students’ performance on one or more of the following:

  1. assigned work, term papers, projects, etc.
  2. class participation which, in certain disciplines, may justify an attendance requirement
  3. progress tests
  4. laboratory tests and/or laboratory work
  5. mid-term and/or final examinations
  6. level of written expression.

The weight accorded to the various elements is at the discretion of the instructor or instructors responsible for the course.
At the beginning of a course the instructor will provide students with the evaluation scheme in writing. The scheme cannot be altered without appropriate notice.
Normally in the winter term and summer session, an instructor will submit final grades no later than seven calendar days after the scheduled final examination in a course or, where there is no final examination, seven calendar days after the last scheduled class in a course. All final grades for all courses are required to be submitted no later than seven calendar days after the University’s last scheduled final examination. In the case of grades for potential graduates, instructors are required to submit final grades no later than three calendar days after the scheduled final examination in a course or, where there is no final examination, three calendar days after the last scheduled class in a course. For the fall term, all final grades for all courses are required to be submitted three days after the commencement of the winter term. There may be additional delays before grades are posted as approvals of the grades and processing time are necessary. Students may obtain their grades through the Concordia website at myconcordia.ca.
Final grades and grade changes are official only when they have been approved by the appropriate Faculty Dean or delegate. The University reserves the right to make corrections at any time in case of error.


16.3.2     Language of Instruction and Examinations

While courses at Concordia University are normally taught in English, if students prefer, they may write assignments and examinations in either English or French. However, language and literature courses may require assignments and examinations to be written in the language being studied. Students who wish to write in French should ask at the beginning of a course whether their instructor can read French or whether someone else will evaluate their work. If the work must be read by another person, extra correction time may be required.


16.3.3     Failing Grades and Administrative Notations

Failing Grades “F,” “FNS,” “R,” and “NR” notations
 

  1. “F” indicates failure in a course in which a supplemental examination is available.
  2. “FNS” indicates failure in a course in which no supplemental examination is available.
  3. In a course graded “R,” a student is not permitted to write a supplemental examination, apply for a “MED” or “DEF” notation, or complete work late.
  4. “NR” stands for not reported and indicates that a student appears to have withdrawn from a course unofficially. It is assigned by the instructor when no material is available to evaluate and the instructor has been unable to submit a grade. “NR” carries a grade point value of zero and counts as a failure.
    In a course with an “NR,” a student is not permitted to apply for a “MED” or “DEF” notation, write deferred or supplemental examinations, or complete work late.

16.3.4     Administrative Notations “CODE,” “CUC,” “DEF,” “DISC,” “DNE,” “DNW,” “EREM,” “EX,” “EXTR,” “INC,” “INIT,” “LATE,” “MED,” “PEND,” “PEX,” “PTR,” “REPT,” “RPT,” “SRCR,” “SREP,” “SUPP,” “TRC,” “TREM,” “VALD,” “WRKT”

  1. “CODE” stands for Academic Code of Conduct Decision, and it is a repetition code that appears only on the student record. It indicates that the grade obtained as a result of a penalty for academic misconduct is included in the calculation of the GPAs whether or not the course has been repeated.
  2. “CUC” stands for Complementary University Credits and indicates credits earned as part of a Complementary University Credit certificate or individual study skills courses. These credits are not considered as program credits earned in any other degree or Faculty certificate program or Independent studies.
  3. “DEF” stands for Deferred and indicates that a student has been unable to write a final examination due to unforeseeable circumstances beyond the student’s control. A “DEF” notation carries no grade point value.
    For information on how to apply for “DEF” notations and the regulations that govern them, see §16.3.8 I.
  4. “DISC” stands for Discontinued and indicates that a student has properly withdrawn from a course after the end of the course-change period. The notation appears permanently on the student record and official transcript. It carries no grade point value and does not count in assessments of academic standing, but does count towards a student’s status (i.e. full- and part-time).
  5. “DNE” stands for Did Not Enter and is a temporary notation indicating that a student has officially withdrawn from a course by the deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund. The course and “DNE” notation are subsequently removed from the student record.
  6. “DNW” stands for Did Not Write and indicates that a student has not written the final examination for a course. The notation is used only in combination with a letter grade (such as “F/DNW,” “B/DNW”).
    A student in good standing may write a supplemental examination (if available) in a course with a “DNW” unless the grade is “R/DNW” or “FNS/DNW.”
    For information on how to apply for supplemental examinations and the regulations that govern them, see §16.3.8 III.
  7. “EREM” stands for Exemption Received Credit Removed and indicates that the credit earned for this course is not retained because it is a repetition of a course for which the student has already received exemption.
  8. “EX” stands for Exemption and indicates an exemption awarded for a course completed at another institution (no credit value).
  9. “EXTR” stands for Extra Credits and indicates that the grade is excluded from the GPA calculation but may be used in a future program.
  10. “INC” stands for Incomplete and indicates that a student has not completed required course work, such as a term paper, assignment, or laboratory and that the instructor has agreed to accept the work after the due date. The notation is used only in combination with a letter grade (such as “F/INC,” “C/INC”) and is assigned on the basis that the missing work is weighted as zero.
    When appropriate, “DNW” and “INC” can be used simultaneously (e.g. “F/INC/DNW”).
    For information on how to apply to complete courses with an “INC” notation, and the regulations that govern late completion, see §16.3.5.
  11. “INIT” stands for Initial Attempt and indicates the initial attempt of a course that was subsequently repeated.
  12. “LATE” stands for Late Completion Grade Obtained and indicates the final grade that replaces the grade attached to the initial enrolment. Only the final grade is included in the GPA. (Used from 1977-92.)
  13. “MED” stands for Medical and indicates that a student has been unable to write a final examination or complete other assignments due to a long-term medical situation. A “MED” notation carries no grade point value.
    For information on how to apply for “MED” notations and the regulations that govern them, see §16.3.8 II.
  14. “PEND” stands for Pending, is assigned by the University Registrar, and indicates that the grade is not available at this time.
  15. “PEX” stands for Potential Exemption and indicates a potential exemption for a course still in progress at another institution (no credit value).
  16. “PTR” stands for Potential Transfer Credits and indicates a potential transfer credit for a course still in progress at another institution.
  17. “REPT” stands for Repeat and indicates that the credit earned for this course is not retained because it is a repetition of a course or of similar course material for which the credit has already been earned.
  18. “RPT” stands for Report and indicates report work completed by a student in a co-operative education program. These credits are not considered as program credits earned.
  19. “SRCR” stands for Special Course Permission and indicates that special permission was given to take the same course more than twice where no credits were earned in previous attempts.
  20. “SREP” stands for Special Course Repetition and indicates that special permission was given to take the same course more than twice where credits are earned at the initial or second attempt.
  21. “SUPP” stands for Supplemental and indicates that supplemental examination credits and grade obtained are retained and included in the cumulative GPA and assessment GPA.
  22. “TREM” stands for Transfer Credit Received, Credits Removed and indicates that the credit earned for this course is not retained because it is a repetition of a course for which transfer credit has already been awarded.
  23. “TRC” stands for Transfer Credits and indicates transfer credit awarded for a course completed at another institution.
  24. “VALD” stands for Valid and identifies a new course with the same course name and number as other courses previously enrolled in. It is not considered as a repetition.
  25. “WRKT” stands for Work Term and indicates work completed by a student during a co-operative education work term. These credits are not considered as program credits earned.

16.3.5     Late Completion of Courses with “INC” Notations
               — Procedures and Regulations

  1. The deadlines for completion of course assignments are given to students on the first day of class. The “INC” notation is assigned when an instructor has agreed that a student may complete work after the deadline.
  2. A student with an “R” grade or “NR” notation in a course may not apply for late completion in that course.
  3. Students must apply for late completion of a course. Applications for Late Completion are available at the Birks Student Service Centre. For each course a processing fee applies.
    (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.) Completed applications must be returned to the Birks Student Service Centre by:
    February 1:  Fall-term courses
    May 15:  Winter-term and fall/winter courses
    September 1:  Summer-session courses
  4. The completed work must be submitted by:
    February 15:  Fall-term courses
    May 30:  Winter-term and fall/winter courses
    September 15:  Summer-session courses
  5. It is the responsibility of the instructor to submit a final grade within five days of these dates.

16.3.6     In Progress “IP” Notations — Procedures and Regulations
               — Faculty of Arts and Science

  1. The IP notation is assigned when an instructor has agreed that the work of a student in a course may be submitted past the time for reporting grades. At the undergraduate level the IP notation is applicable only to the completion of an honours thesis, internship or fieldwork outside of the University, or directed study or research. Students should refer to §31.003.3 for a list of applicable courses within the Faculty of Arts and Science. In all cases, the assignment of this notation is due to third party involvement in course work, where it is beyond the control of the instructor and/or the student for the student to complete the work within the required deadline.
  2. The completed work must be submitted by:
    April 1:  Fall-term courses
    August 1:  Winter-term and fall/winter courses
    December 1:  Summer-session courses
  3. It is the responsibility of the instructor to submit a final grade within 10 days of these dates.
  4. If the completed work is not submitted by the stated deadline, the IP notation will be changed to a letter grade.

16.3.7     Examinations

Students must present identification in order to write any examination. Acceptable identification is: Concordia student ID card or Medicare card or driver’s licence that bears the photo and signature of the student. Unless expressly permitted by the instructor, the possession of electronic communication devices is prohibited during examinations.

I.      Final Examinations

  1. Academic Calendar §11 lists the official examination periods.
  2. Examination schedules are posted in the Mezzanine of the Hall Building and in the second floor of the John Molson School of Business (SGW Campus) and CC 214 (LOY Campus); on kiosks throughout the campuses; or through the Concordia website at myconcordia.ca.
  3. Because special arrangements cannot be made in the event of personal time conflicts (including personal travel plans), students should not make commitments for the examination periods until after the final schedule is posted. Nonetheless, in certain documented circumstances, a student who will not be in the Montreal area during the official final examination period can request to write his/her examination at another university or college.
    A student who needs to write at an external institution must submit a “Request to Write a Concordia University Exam at an External Institution” available from the Birks Student Service Centre. The completed request should be submitted to the Birks Student Service Centre within the following deadlines:
    November 15:  for December final examination period
    April 1:  for April-May final examination period
    June 1:  for June final examination period

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