Hard Copy Of Cover Letter

How to Sign a Cover Letter With Signature Examples

What should you include in your signature when you're writing a cover letter to apply for a job? It varies, depending on how you are applying for the position. The format and information included in your signature is different for mailed, uploaded, and emailed cover letter documents. 

How to Sign a Cover Letter That's Uploaded or Mailed 

If you're uploading your cover letter to a job site, your signature will simply include a closing and your full name.

Place a comma after your close (e.g. Best, or Sincerely yours,) and then put your name on the line below. 

When you're sending a written letter, include a closing, your handwritten signature, and your typed full name. Leave several spaces between the close and your typed name. That way, you'll have room for your signature when you print out the letter. Sign using either blue or black ink. 

For uploaded or mailed cover letters, you do not need to include as much information as you would in an email message. That's because the heading of your cover letter includes your contact information.

A paper cover letter is a formal business style letter of application which includes a heading, salutation, the body of the letter, closing, and your signature. Review these guidelines for what to include in your letter.

How to Sign an Email Cover Letter

If you are sending your cover letter or inquiry letter by email, end with a polite sign-off followed by your full name.

 You do not need to sign a cover letter that is being sent electronically. Write out your full name in the same font as the rest of the letter (no need for italics or a handwriting font). 

The formatting here is very similar to an uploaded cover letter. However, emails do not have a header with your phone number or other contact information.

 It's a good idea to include these details in your closing paragraph or after your typed signature. This makes it easy for the employer or networking contact to get in touch with you.

You can also include links to online portfolios (if appropriate) or a link to your professional social media account (LinkedIn, Twitter). You don't want to make this section too cluttered, however, so restrict yourself to the most relevant information. 

Here's how to set up an email signature, along with more advice on what to include in it (and what to leave off). 

Cover Letter Document Signature Examples

Here's how your signature should look: 

Closing, (see sample closings)

Handwritten Signature (for mailed letters only)

FirstName LastName

For example (signed letter):

Best Regards,

Janet Dolan (Your Signature)

Janet Dolan

For example (uploaded letter):

Best Regards,

Janet Dolan

Email Cover Letter Signature Examples

When you are sending email cover letters, it's important to include contact information so the hiring manager can easily view how to contact you. At the least, you should include your name, email address, and phone number. Other information, like your street address, online portfolio, or social media accounts, is considered optional.

Sample Email Signature
Your Name
Email
Phone

Sample Email Signature With Full Address
Your Name
Street Street
City, State, Zip
Email
Phone

Sample Email Signature With LinkedIn
Your Name
Email
Phone
LinkedIn Profile (Optional)

Sample Email Signature With Twitter
Your Name
Email
Phone
LinkedIn Profile (Optional)
Twitter Account (Optional)

Quick Tip:  Don't use your work email address for job searching. Use your personal email account or set up a unique account to use just for your job hunt. There are many free online email services, like Gmail and Yahoo mail, you can use to set up a new email account for your job search. Even though you are using your personal account, your email address should still be professional. Your best bet is some variation on first initial, last name (e.g., jdoe@gmail.com) or first name, last name (janedoe@gmail.com).

Here's how to set up an email account just for your job search.

How to Write a Cover Letter
Get information on how to write a cover letter, including what to include in your cover letter, cover letter format, targeted cover letters, and cover letter samples and examples.

The following are actual cover letters for articles I submitted in hard copy; some journals (e.g. PMLA) still require hard copy submission. A cover letter should include the main components of a business letter, and it should be very short and to the point. You may describe - briefly - how the article came about (i.e. based on work for a course, or based on a thesis chapter, etc.). Be sure to mention your article's title - if the journal requires the article itself to be stripped of identifying details, the cover letter is your papertrail that confirms the article as yours. Read and follow all journal specifications to the letter: different journals have different specifications, even for a cover letter; hence, I present two samples. I also present the second in order to present the response I got: a round rejection. Rejections by scholarly editors are important and must not be read as discouragement, but as critique.

Sample 1 | Sample 2 | Sample rejection letter

Mark McCutcheon
[address - institutional, if possible]
[phone]
[email - institutional, if possible]

 

Dr Keith Negus, Co-ordinating editor (Articles)
Popular Music
[journal address]
[country, if different]

 

April 27, 2004

 

Dear Dr Negus,

Enclosed please find three copies of my essay '"Let the Bass Kick, All I'm Offering is the Truth": Techno, Science Fiction, and the Critique of Economic Rationalization' for submission to Popular Music.

The essay, including end matter, comprises 3240 words (12 pages in total); three copies each of the two photographs to which the essay refers are also enclosed. Please note that I have tried to document some of the 'underground' cultural productions studied herein - e.g. white label records, dance party performances, online forum postings - with as close adherence as their available data permit to your journal's citation specifications.

Thank you for considering this submission to your journal. I look forward to your reply.

 

With my best regards,

 

[signature]

 

Mark McCutcheon, PhD Candidate
School of English and Theatre Studies
University of Guelph

 

Mark McCutcheon
[address - institutional, if possible]
[phone]
[email - institutional, if possible]

 

The Editor
Studies in Romanticism
[journal address]
[country, if different]
02215

Dear editor of Studies in Romanticism,

Please find enclosed two copies of my essay "Liber Amoris and the Lineaments of William Hazlitt's Desire" (33 pages), which I submit for your consideration. As per your submission guidelines, the essay adheres to MLA style and is accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

Abstract:
This essay argues that the discourse of prostitution provides an organizing yet curiously understudied context for William Hazlitt's Liber Amoris. Of central importance to this argument is the defamation of Sarah Walker's character, which has been perpetuated by a critical tradition that has tended to accept Hazlitt's word on Walker without question and consequently to dismiss feminist interpretations that attend to the specific historical contingencies determining his representation. By reviewing the critical literature on Hazlitt's "book of love," and by paying fresh attention to the text itself -- an attention rewarded by the discovery of heretofore unnoticed quotations -- the essay advances a feminist reading of this book as a travesty of romance in which Hazlitt's libertinism intersects suggestively with his radical politics.

I look forward to your reply, and wish you the best with Studies in Romanticism and your various other endeavors.

Sincerely,

[signature]

Mark McCutcheon

 

Editor's reply to Sample 2

24 April 2003

Dear Mr. McCutcheon:

Im sorry to have to disappoint you, but we have decided against publishing your essay on the Liber Amoris. Assuming we understand it correctly, your idea of comparing the sexism (even if assumed for parodic intentions) of Hazlitt's portrait of Sarah Walker in the book with the discourse of certain contemporary critical receptions of it is a clever one, but--that said--we often found your argument so convoluted with innuendo as to be hard to construe. And there is finally something a bit weak about the essay's conclusion: it seems more interested in attaching itself to an already extant critical interpretation than in saying something of its own about the book. Considering the occasional aggression of the argument, and the rather alarming (under the circumstances) endorsement of Derrida's metaphoric "hymen," the essay finally comes to seem a little overdone. We're sorry if this reaction seems ungenerous, and we appreciate the essay's scholarship and intelligence, but it seemed to us to have a bit too much effect for its own good as a coherent argument.

 

Sincerely

[Editor's name]

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